Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

Painter Douglas Snow

Sep 1, 2011
V. Douglas Snow, Cockscomb Near Teasdale, 1985, courtesy the Springville Museum of Art collection, 1989.069

Most of us know the paintings of the artist Douglas Snow through his public installations - at the airport and the lobby of the Pioneer Theatre. His pieces are often shocking when you first come upon them and they prompt a strong reaction. That reaction must have delighted Snow, who never created his works to simply blend in. Doug Snow died in 2009 and a retrospective of his work has just opened in Salt Lake City. Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with him about his connection to place. (Rebroadcast)

Utah's Timpanogos Storytelling Festival is this weekend, and Thursday, Doug is joined by featured performer Kevin Kling. Kling is a humorist, perhaps best known for his commentaries on NPR. His stories are autobiographical - funny, but deeply personal. Kling shares everything from holidays in Minnesota and performing his banned play in Czechoslovakia to living with a birth defect and surviving a near fatal motor cycle accident. He joins Doug to talk about the power in story to overcome tragedy.

Prisoner of Zion

Aug 31, 2011
Qala-i-Jangi, Afghanistan. Photo by Scott Carrier

Wednesday, Doug is joined by independent radio producer Scott Carrier. When the US invaded Afghanistan after the attacks on 9/11, Carrier decided to go there too. He wanted to meet the enemy himself and find out what life is like in their world. But when he returned, he also found an enemy at home. It was the fear and anger that he says Americans have towards others. Scott Carrier has just published a book of stories from the post-9/11 world. It's called "Prisoner of Zion."

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/42931449@N07/5299199423/">photosteve101</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

There's been a lot of talk since the economy stumbled about how to get it back on track. Should the government cut taxes or spend money to get things flowing again? This debate isn't new; it's been raging since the Great Depression, when economists Friedrich Hayek and John Maynard Keynes developed theories that get to the heart of this fundamental question. Tuesday, we're talking about supply-side and demand-side economics and asking what each approach could do to make a difference today.

Courtesy <a href="http://www.seis.utah.edu/lqthreat/perseq.shtml" target="_blank">University of Utah Seismograph Stations</a>

There's geologic evidence of 6.5 and greater earthquakes violently shaking our region. Seismologists say it will happen again in Utah, though it's difficult to say when. We do know that there could be devastating consequences for the urban landscape. As the saying goes, "Earthquakes don't kill people, buildings do." Thursday, we're talking about what scientists are learning about earthquakes, what one would mean for the Wasatch Front and what is being done to prepare our community. (Rebroadcast)

How Pleasure Works

Aug 26, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/albx79/2568081951/">Alberto Colombo</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Friday on RadioWest, the psychologist Paul Bloom joins Doug to explain how pleasure works. This is more than just about the simple pleasures of food or sex. How do you account for the pleasure of seeing a painting, for example, or for some, the pleasure of getting spanked? Pleasure is complicated, and Bloom says it's grounded in a belief about the essence of a thing. It's a conversation about philosophy, neuroscience, evolution, childhood development ... about why we desire what we desire. (Rebroadcast)

This past Monday, Utah Representative Jason Chaffetz announced he would not run against six-term Senator Orrin Hatch. Many observers were anticipating a race between the two Republicans and potential candidates were waiting to see what Chaffetz might do before throwing their hats in the ring. Thursday on RadioWest, we'll talk with Congressman Chaffetz about his decision and about his goals in Washington. We'll also be joined by a panel to discuss what all of this means for Utah in 2012.

Boys of Bonneville

Aug 24, 2011

Wednesday, we're talking about Ab Jenkins, a Utah man who pushed the limits of speed. More than 70 years ago, Jenkins raced his custom-built Duesenberg Special called the "Mormon Meteor" across the Bonneville Salt Flats. Jenkins set 26 records in that car and half of them still stand today. Now, there's a new documentary about Ab Jenkins and the Boys of Bonneville. We'll talk to director Curt Wallin and others about the film and about the newly restored Mormon Meteor.

Lunch Wars

Aug 23, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/wlscience/4569761556/">Ben W</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

The average American kid will have some 3,000 school lunches by the twelfth grade. But what are they eating? When filmmaker and author Amy Kalafa went into school cafeterias, she found lunch trays laden with chicken nuggets and French fries, but little in the way of healthy choices. The question she kept hearing from parents though was "What do we do about it?" Kalafa has written a book called "Lunch Wars," and Tuesday, she joins us to explain how to start a school food revolution.

<a href="http://www.rickperry.org/" target="_blank">www.rickperry.org</a>

Texas Governor Rick Perry is shaking up the GOP Presidential race. Within 3 days of entering, a Rasmussen poll already showed him with a double digit lead over Romney and Bachmann. Perry's appealing to the Evangelical Christian vote with a massive prayer rally earlier this month and his vocal skepticism on issues like evolution. Monday, we're talking about Perry's faith and about his relationship to the New Apostolic Reformation - a conservative Christian movement with clear political goals.

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