Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

International Refugee Assistance Project/Twitter http://bit.ly/2xKuM5y

Becca Heller likes to say that she leads an army. But her soldiers don’t battle with guns. They’re lawyers and law students. They use the law to protect the legal and human rights of refugees seeking shelter and assistance, and their work has never been easy. It only got more difficult with the election of Donald Trump and his efforts to enact a travel ban. Heller is in Utah this week, and she joins us Thursday to talk about America’s immigration policies and the challenges of refugee resettlement.

KUER file photo

The LDS Church may have been founded by an uneducated, 19th century tenant farmer, but historian D. Michael Quinn estimates its 2010 tithing income at $33 billion dollars. And that’s to say nothing of the Church’s investments, business holdings, and “seemingly endless capital.” To understand the Church’s economic history, Quinn says you have to understand God as the ultimate CEO of the Church and its business on earth. He joins us to talk about his new book on Mormon “Wealth and Corporate Power.”

From Here to Eternity

Oct 31, 2017

There are death rituals around the world that might strike you as morbid, disrespectful, or downright gross. In Japan, survivors pick through their loved one’s cremated ashes with chopsticks to find bone fragments. In Tibet, bodies are eaten by vultures. Tuesday, mortician Caitlin Doughty joins us to talk about the rituals she chronicles in a new book. Doughty says these traditions give families time and space to mourn, something she argues is sorely missing in American culture today.

Edgar Allan Poe

Oct 30, 2017

Who was the real Edgar Allan Poe? One of America’s most iconic writers, his name and reputation are synonymous with the horror and the macabre. But he also invented the detective story and refined the sci-fi genre. And Poe’s popular image as a shadowy misanthrope toiling on the cultural margins bears little resemblance to the magazine editor and influential critic. In a new documentary, filmmaker Eric Stange explores the real story of the notorious author and the life of tragedy that inspired him.

Wheeler Copperthwaite via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2szlOWg

The journalist Sam Quinones has called opiate addiction “the closest thing to enslavement that we have in America today.” It’s a scourge fueled by pharmaceutical companies and drug cartels, and it takes advantage of some heavy cultural baggage on either side of the border. Poor people in Mexico are looking for a leg up, while disaffected people in the world’s richest country just want to check out. Quinones joins us to discuss the culture of the opiate epidemic. (Rebroadcast)


Thursday, we’re talking about what happened to Russia. The fall of the USSR was followed by a period of liberalization, and the country appeared to be on the path towards democracy. Then Vladimir Putin rose to power. He invaded neighboring countries. He led a crackdown on political opposition. He’s waging war on the concept of Western democracy. But where has his regime left Russia and its people? Journalist Masha Gessen joins us Tuesday to share what she’s learned about how totalitarianism reclaimed Russia.

istock

Our guest Wednesday has written a book with a slightly off-color title: The A--hole Survival Guide. Robert Sutton is a Professor of Organizational Behavior at Stanford University, and his book is a how-to for dealing with the jerks in your own life. And the problem isn’t just them. Sutton says research shows that if you work with a jerk, there’s a good chance you might become one. Robert Sutton joins Doug live to talk about identifying, outwitting, and disarming the a-holes around you.

The How-To Heretic

Oct 24, 2017

Tuesday, Doug is live with Uncle Dan and Uncle Mark, hosts of a new podcast called The How-To Heretic. It might surprise you that another atheist podcast Dan co-hosts from right here in Salt Lake City is really popular around the globe. So what do former Mormons have to teach the world about life without God? We’ll talk about their stories, where atheists fit in American society today, and about teaching people skills for a post-religion lifestyle, like avoiding logical fallacies and swearing.

The Ice Front

Oct 23, 2017
Guillaume Speurt, CC via Flickr, http://bit.ly/2yY699N

Monday, we’re telling a thrilling story from World War II: a troupe of Norwegian actors resisting the Nazi occupation and risking their lives to keep a vile, anti-Semitic play from being staged. The Nazis were using it as a propaganda tool and forcing the National Theater to perform it – at gun point. Utah playwright Eric Samuelsen has dramatized the story of the actors who had to decide if they should take a stand. It’s called The Ice Front, and it’s the latest production of Plan-B Theatre Company.

 

These days, the writer Alexandra Fuller lives in a yurt in Jackson Hole. It’s a far cry from where she grew up: under the cloud of civil war in what was once called Rhodesia in southern Africa. Fuller has chronicled her life in a series of acclaimed memoirs, writing fearlessly about war, family, and the collapse of her decades-long marriage. Her newest book is a novel about two Native American cousins on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. She joins us to talk about her life, her work, and how they overlap. (Rebroadcast)

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