RadioWest

Weekdays Live at 9:00 a.m. Mountain / Rebroadcast at 7:00 p.m. Mountain

Conversations and stories that explore the way the world works.

Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. KUER 90.1  (9 a.m. and 7 p.m.); Streaming at radiowest.org

Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/25968780@N03/4614784650/>dh</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr

Utah's famed powder snow -- snow so great it typically covers local mountains well into the summer -- faces a dim prognosis. Several recent studies suggest spring snowpack in the Mountain West is dwindling, the result of a warming climate. If the predictions hold true, in the future the region will see less snow and more rain from fewer, more intense storms. A panel of guests joins Doug on Wednesday to talk about global warming's toll on the region's snowpack and the potential side effects. 

There's geologic evidence of 6.5 and greater earthquakes violently shaking our region. Seismologists say it will happen again in Utah, though it's difficult to say when. We do know that there could be devastating consequences for the urban landscape. Tuesday, the state is sponsoring an earthquake drill called "The Great Utah ShakeOut," so we're taking the opportunity to rebroadcast our conversation about earthquakes and what one would mean for the Wasatch Front. (Rebroadcast)

Fringeology

Apr 13, 2012

Many of us have stories of paranormal events. Strange objects in the skies, ghosts at the old hotel. When Steve Volk was a kid, odd bumps echoed through his house at night. His sisters said their sheets were pulled from their beds while they slept and that an old woman walked through the closed door of their room. Inspired by the noise his family could never trace, Volk set out to explore the world of the paranormal. Doug talks to him about his research in the field of fringeology. (Rebroadcast)

Neil deGrasse Tyson, the director of the Hayden Planetarium and one of America's most vocal proponents of space exploration, is as fascinated with the depth and mysteries of outer space as he is with its proximity. "We are part of this universe; we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts, is that the universe is in us," he has said. Tyson joins Doug on Tuesday to talk about his personal relationship with the cosmos and his crusade to get humanity back into space.

A canine orphan of World War I, Rin Tin Tin was rescued from a French battlefield and went on to become one of the most renowned names of 20th century entertainment. Susan Orlean wrote about the life and legend of the famous German shepherd, his descendants and their owners,tracing in the rise of dogs in American life and the cinema and exploring the bond between humans and animals. Orlean talks with Doug on Wednesday about the legacy of Rin Tin Tin. (Rebroadcast)

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