Curiousities

Culture, ideas and society.

Kelsie Moore / KUER

We are not letting a pandemic get in the way of our favorite bi-annual show, even though, this time around, we won’t have the pleasure of seeing our studio filled with books and book people. 

Renee Bright/KUER

The writer Bill Buford wanted to learn the secrets of French haute cuisine. So, he went native. Buford and his family moved to Lyon, France, where he undertook a rigorous, enlightening and delectable education.

A Fish Story

Apr 24, 2020
Renee Bright / KUER

In 1906, an earthquake destroyed scientist David Starr Jordan’s collection of newly discovered fish. His life’s work was utterly ruined. But he tried, very literally, to put the pieces back together.

The Joys Of Walking

Apr 16, 2020
Renee Bright / KUER

 


For a society that is currently homebound, there seems no greater pleasure at this time than a simple walk. A month ago, we would go out to eat, to a concert or to see friends. These days, we walk the hills and our neighborhoods, the movement and outdoors our solace.

Renee Bright / KUER

We know we’re not the first civilization to face a paralyzing pandemic – the history of plagues and pandemics is a long one when you look back over time. 

Nate Balli

In 2015, ecologist Nalini Nadkarni fell 50 feet from the top of a tree. As she fought to regain her strength over the next year, Nalini realized that due to her earlier research on a theory she termed “disturbance and recovery,” she had the tools she needed to help her get well.

Renee Bright / KUER

 

It was an international corporation that became an eighteenth century colonial power with its own army – and all entirely run by British stockholders who reported  to a board of directors in London, most of whom had never been to India. 

Renee Bright / KUER

Have you ever heard of the Texas Dip? It’s a wild curtsy you might see performed—or botched—at a debutante ball. Kristen Richardson calls it a magic trick. And, yes, debutantes are still a thing. They’re the subject of her new book The Season.

Erik Neumann

As an observer of nature, Terry Tempest Williams knows the impact that water, time and wind have a landscape. In her new book “Erosion,” Williams turns her gaze and pen to other types of erosion: the social breakdown of trust, democracy and compassion.

Michael Lionstar

In her most recent book, The Lost Art of Scripture, religious scholar Karen Armstrong looks into the history of sacred texts, showing how religious practitioners' relationships with them have changed, and how many of us have lost sight of what they were originally written for. 

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