Sexual Assault

  This month, The Salt Lake Tribune has been following the story of BYU students who say they’ve been punished under the school’s honor code because they reported sexual assaults. Some of the questions these women are facing have been experienced around the country: will they be believed, shamed or blamed for being a victim? Tuesday, we’re asking how LDS culture and theology of chastity complicates this, and if there are lessons from the Mormon experience that might help challenge assumptions about rape in America.

Monday, we continue our Sundance coverage with AUDRIE & DAISY. The two teen girls were raped and this documentary examines the fallout of shaming and bullying on social media that followed. Audrie was overwhelmed by what she saw as irreparable damage to her reputation and committed suicide. Daisy's story made national headlines, and her family became the target of an enraged community. Filmmakers Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk join Doug to explore what they call a modern-day "Scarlet Letter."

Asking For It

Nov 30, 2015

Monday, Doug’s guest is feminist author Kate Harding, whose most recent book is a blunt examination of sexual assault as a social phenomenon. Harding says we talk about it in the passive voice: “Local woman raped.” But somebody is to blame, and Harding argues our culture is diverting scrutiny from the criminals and asking the wrong questions of victims. She joins us to talk about the ways stereotypes in entertainment, news media, politics, and daily life have created our rape culture.

Monday, University of Utah President David Pershing joins us to continue our conversation about sexual assault on college campuses. We'll ask him how he's thinking about the issue as both leader of Utah's largest public university and as a father.  We'll then talk to journalist Robin Wilson and Westminster College's General Counsel Melissa Flores to discuss how it is that universities became responsible for handling assault cases and what new federal regulations mean for the way institutions protect their students.

Wednesday, we continue our examination of the problem of sexual assault on America's college campuses. Alcohol is at the heart of that problem. According to researchers, students who are either the victims of rape or the assailants are more often than not drunk. But, for lots of reasons, schools avoid directly discussing alcohol and rape in the same breath. We’ll talk about what colleges and universities should be doing to prevent rape and where the blame lay when an assault does occur.

A troubling statistic has been making a lot of headlines recently: 20% of college women are sexually assaulted in the US. So Monday, we’re asking if there is something inherent in the structure of college life that puts students at risk. Sociologist Elizabeth Armstrong says many students think they deserve a social experience that’s more about partying than academics, and competition for tuition dollars has universities providing them with what they want over what they need. She'll join us to talk about what this means for women and men.

There are 1.5 million active-duty personnel in the U.S. Armed Forces. Sexual assault is an increasing problem within those ranks. In many, if not most cases, it's swept under the carpet: only 8 percent of sexual assault cases are prosecuted in the military, and only 2 percent of those cases result in convictions. The Academy Award-winning filmmaker Kirby Dick's documentary film The Invisible War sheds light on the suffering of thousands of military rape victims, and Thursday we're rebroadcasting our conversation about it. (Rebroadcast)