Culture

Culture, Ideas, Religion

Courtesy of Kristen Oney / Plimoth Plantation

When they landed at Plymouth almost 400 years ago, the Pilgrims faced countless challenges. Their story is the bedrock of the American experiment, but the facts of their survival have long been tangled up with the myths. (Rebroadcast)

Tuesday, we’re talking about the history versus the memory of the Civil War. Yale historian David Blight says there’s a lot of misunderstanding about the period, but getting it right matters because the stories we tell about who we were then define who are now.

iGen

Nov 20, 2017
Anthony Kelly via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2xMGmgU

Psychologist Jean Twenge joins us to talk about the kids these days. She says teenagers today are different than the Millenials that preceded them. They’re more depressed, more suicidal and less independent. The reason? It could be smartphones.

Filmmaker Doug Nichol’s new documentary is a tribute to typewriters. In an age of high-tech, do-it-all gadgetry, the typewriter may be on the edge of extinction, but it still offers artists of all stripes unique access to the creative spirit.

Monday, we're talking about our massive food waste problem. A full forty percent of food in America ends up in the trash. Activist Tristram Stuart joins us to talk about why we waste so much food and what we can and should do about it.

It's All Relative

Nov 9, 2017

You’ve probably got that one family member who just drives you crazy. Maybe it’s their politics or their constant talk about their cat’s eating habits, but you put up with it because their family, right? Well, experimental journalist A.J. Jacobs wants you to think more broadly, because the way he sees it, we’re all cousins. His latest book is a dive into genealogy and the new ways we’re understanding the human family. He’s coming to Utah, and joins us to talk about the world’s family tree.

Blurred Lines

Nov 8, 2017

Wednesday, we’re talking to journalist Vanessa Grigoriadis, whose controversial new book looks at sex and sexual violence on college campuses. Grigoriadis interviewed more than 100 students, as well as parents and college administrators, to try to understand how sex, power, and consent work on campus these days. The answer is really complicated with good and terrible sides to the story. There’s also a lot of what she calls the mushy middle. Her book is called Blurred Lines.

Jeffrey Jones via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2Ajfk23), CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1hYHpKw)

What do you do when a panhandler approaches you? Do you give money? Do you give food? Maybe you don’t give the person anything. Maybe you donate to a homeless services organization, or volunteer at the soup kitchen instead. But what should you do? That’s what we’re asking on Monday’s show. Our guests work closely with Utah’s homeless population, and they all agree, there are no easy answers when it comes to the ethical questions around panhandling.

From Here to Eternity

Oct 31, 2017

There are death rituals around the world that might strike you as morbid, disrespectful, or downright gross. In Japan, survivors pick through their loved one’s cremated ashes with chopsticks to find bone fragments. In Tibet, bodies are eaten by vultures. Tuesday, mortician Caitlin Doughty joins us to talk about the rituals she chronicles in a new book. Doughty says these traditions give families time and space to mourn, something she argues is sorely missing in American culture today.

Wheeler Copperthwaite via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2szlOWg

The journalist Sam Quinones has called opiate addiction “the closest thing to enslavement that we have in America today.” It’s a scourge fueled by pharmaceutical companies and drug cartels, and it takes advantage of some heavy cultural baggage on either side of the border. Poor people in Mexico are looking for a leg up, while disaffected people in the world’s richest country just want to check out. Quinones joins us to discuss the culture of the opiate epidemic. (Rebroadcast)

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