Culture

Culture, Ideas, Religion

There are death rituals around the world you might find offensive, but mortician Caitlin Doughty says they give families space to mourn. She argues that's something missing in American culture today.

INTELLECTUAL RESERVE, INC.

You might not expect it from a 94-year-old, but LDS Church President Russell M. Nelson has been shaking things up. Monday, we’re talking about what happened at General Conference and what it means.

In a new book, the writer Kim Brooks investigates how a culture of fear and anxiety has shaped modern parenting. It’s also about her personal story of defending herself against a charge of child neglect.

How To Be A Stoic

Sep 28, 2018

How to live a good life is a central question to the human experience. Ancient Stoic philosophers sought to answer it by focusing on virtue, mindfulness, and what is or isn't in our control.

90s Bitch

Sep 24, 2018
Collage of famous women from the 1990s.
AllisonYarrow.com

Journalist Allison Yarrow says in the 90s a woman reaching for power or just in the public eye was often labeled a "bitch." And that word became a weapon used to hold women back.

Sculpture of a man in agony
Public domain

In a new book, the philosopher Scott Samuelson offers seven ways of looking at suffering. He pulls wisdom from the lessons of ancient Greek myth, the horrors of the Holocaust, and the beautiful pain of blues music.

Monday, we’re broadcasting the second conversation in our Realities of Diversity speaker series. Our guest is Negin Farsad. She uses comedy to confront the tough stuff, like racism, bigotry and ignorance.

Asking For A Friend

Sep 14, 2018
Woman reading newspaper.
Diego Sevilla Ruiz, CC via Flickr, https://bit.ly/2trHWEI

Friday, we're talking about what advice columnists have had to say over the years about life and love. Author Jessica Weisberg says our questions are the same, it’s the answers that have changed.

The psychologist Alison Gopnik worries that parenting is too much like being a carpenter, where you shape chosen materials into a final product. But what if we parented more like gardeners—creating nurturing spaces in which children can flourish?

New Yorker staff writer Jelani Cobb writes about the problems we have in this country with race and injustice. He says that race may just be a mythology, but it’s also a useful way of looking at our checkered history, and talking about it isn’t easy.

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