Profiles

The Columnist

Jun 11, 2012
Andrew Eccles

Tuesday, we're exploring the life of Joseph Alsop, a journalist whose syndicated newspaper column ran for some five decades. Arrogant yet beloved, Alsop was among the writers who influenced not only public opinion, but who guided top politicians as well. But with the turbulent 60s came his decline in power and the unraveling of his complicated personal life. Doug is joined by Pulitzer-winning playwright David Auburn and Alsop's stepdaughter Anne Milliken for a look at "The Columnist."

In 2000, Daniel Suelo left his life savings, just $30, in a phone booth in Moab and walked away. Twelve years later, he enjoys an apparently full and sane life without money, credit, barter or government hand-outs, fulfilling a vision of the good life inspired by his spiritual guides: Jesus, Buddha and wandering Hindu monks. The writer Mark Sundeen has written a book that traces the path and the singular idea that led Suelo to his extreme lifestyle, and he joins Doug on Friday. (Rebroadcast)

Cleopatra

May 24, 2012

Biographer Stacy Schiff says that Cleopatra has had "one of the busiest afterlives in history." This Queen of Egypt died over 2000 years ago, but since then she's been the subject of poems and plays, she's had an asteroid and a cigarette named after her. But for all the fame, much of what we think we know about Cleopatra just isn't so. Schiff joins us to rescue the queen from her legend. (Rebroadcast)

A few years ago, David Finch’s marriage was on the skids. Moments of joy and affection between he and his wife, Kristen, had become rare. One day, Kristen sprung a 150-question quiz on David. It was an informal test for Asperger syndrome, and David aced it. The diagnosis explained David’s long list of quirks and compulsions, and set him on a quest to better understand himself and to become a better husband. His book is called The Journal of Best Practices and he’ll talk with Doug about it on Thursday.

The Guardian Poplar

May 4, 2012
KUED Channel 7

When former University of Utah President Chase Peterson began writing his memoir, it was largely to displace panic after a cancer diagnosis. He says his book is not the story of an academician, a scientist or a physician, though Dr. Peterson is all of those things. It's what he calls a "human and spiritual journey," that took him from the American West to New England and home again. Monday, Chase Peterson talks with us about the people he has served and the moments that brought his life meaning.

Frank Sinatra called Spencer Tracy “The Gray Fox.” Some actors called him “The Pope.” The biographer James Curtis calls Tracy the greatest actor of his generation. Through the years, Tracy’s legacy has faded, eclipsed by that of Katharine Hepburn, one of his great loves. Curtis has written a biography of Tracy that refurbishes his story, detailing his relationship with his wife, Louise, his love affair with Hepburn, his drinking problem and his inimitable acting chops. Curtis joins Doug on Tuesday.

The Book of Love

Apr 18, 2012
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/archer10/2214450463/">Dennis Jarvis</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

When the Hindu philosopher Vatsayana wrote the Kamasutra some 2000 years ago, he said that he did so in a spirit of chastity and meditation – not for the sake of passion. So how is it that the treatise has become synonymous with sexual ecstasy and acrobatic positions? The writer James McConnachie joins us to tell the story of the Kamasutra’s journey from India to Victorian England and the role it has played in the West’s ongoing wars over sexuality and morality.

For more than four decades, one of America's most astonishing whodunits has gone unsolved. "D.B. Cooper" was on a flight from Portland to Seattle when he handed over a bomb threat. The airline gave him $200,000 and the hijacker parachuted from the plane, never to be seen again. Cooper evaded one of the most extensive manhunts of the 20th century and has become the stuff of legend. Monday, investigative journalist Geoffrey Gray joins Doug to separate myth from fact in the case of D.B. Cooper.

During her long tenure as a film critic at the New Yorker, Pauline Kael was the tastemaker. With her brash, vernacular style and unalloyed opinions, she often generated controversy. She also created an impressive body of criticism that still haunts and inspires film critics. Unlike the movies she so passionately reviewed, Kael's life went largely unreported. The writer Brian Kellow has written a biography of Kael that captures this tough, exacting woman, and he'll join Doug on Thursday. 

In 2000, a man in Moab left his life savings - $30 - in a phone booth and walked away. Twelve years later, Daniel Suelo enjoys an apparently full and sane life without money, credit, barter or government hand-outs, fulfilling a vision of the good life inspired by his spiritual guides: Jesus, Buddha and wandering Hindu monks. The writer Mark Sundeen has written a book that traces the path and the singular idea that led Suelo to his extreme lifestyle, and he joins Doug on Wednesday.

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