Science

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Wild Horse Country

1 hour ago
James Marvin Phelps via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2yGkgMB

The wild horse is a majestic, beloved, and federally protected icon of the American frontier with a history as epic as the land it inhabits. It’s also the subject of heated controversy and dispute.

Matt Buck via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2BUKw

Well, it’s back. Again. Bad air is choking northern Utah, and it could be around for a while. But we’re not the only ones who have to deal with toxic air pollution. These days it’s a global problem, and people everywhere are looking for solutions.

Woolly

Dec 8, 2017
Photo by Timothy Nessam, http://bit.ly/2wjjMLQ, CC via Flickr

Believe it or not, scientists are actually trying to bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction. It's not going to be easy, but if they get it right, and if they manage all the legal and ethical hurdles, the results could actually help save the world.

 

Friday, we're talking about how unhealthy sugar is for you. No, we're not trying to be killjoys. But as you recover from and regret that third helping of pie on Thanksgiving, we thought you might want to know why you'd probably be healthier without sugar. (Rebroadcast)

Josué Menjivar via CC/Flickr http://bit.ly/2zqVOnr


Changing people’s minds is hard. And it’s a problem a lot of people encounter on Thanksgiving. Neuroscientist Tali Sharot studies decision-making. She says we can better influence people by understanding how the brain is wired.

Serious researchers long shied away from so-called anthropomorphism. But biologist John Shivik says animal personalities and emotion are key to understanding how species evolved. So why are some animals shy and others ornery? Shivik joins us Thursday.

Wednesday, we’re asking this question: Is it true that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger? Investigative journalist and anthropologist Scott Carney went looking for answers. He joins us to talk about pushing past perceived limitations.

No idea from psychology has saturated popular culture as thoroughly as Hermann Rorschach’s inkblots. Rorschach designed the ten amorphous, symmetrical inkblots as a means to probe the human mind. He believed that what you see is who you are. He died less than a year after publishing his test, and the inkblots became a kind of sorcerer’s apprentice, influencing the world without his guidance.  In a new biography, writer Damion Searls chronicles Rorschach’s life and the influence of his iconic creation.

The Ends of the World

Oct 16, 2017
Mark Byzewski via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2kLZtoW), CC BY 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1mhaR6e)

Throughout human history, people have warned that the end of the world is coming. If it does, it won’t really be all that unique. You see, the world has already ended five times. Life on earth has been broiled, frozen, gassed, smothered, and asteroided out of existence. And scientists believe that those previous mass extinctions can teach us something about the one happening right now. Monday, science writer Peter Brannen joins us to explore the Earth’s past dead ends and what they mean for the future.

 

Is there anybody out there? Is there life on other planets? If the answer is yes, and we can prove it, the physicist Jim Al-Khalili says that would be a revolutionary moment in science, up there with Copernicus proving that Earth is not the center of the universe. Considering the vastness of space, scientists mostly agree that somebody or something else is out there. Al-Khalili joins us Wednesday to explore where that life might be, what it might be like, and what would happen if we found it—or it found us. (Rebroadcast)

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