LDS Women

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Wednesday, we’re talking about new LDS Church President Russell M. Nelson, other changes in the First Presidency, and how the Church may meet the challenges of a global faith in the 21st century.

Mormons and Sex

Jun 29, 2017

Thursday, we’re talking about Mormons and sex. LDS therapist Jennifer Finlayson-Fife says that Mormon theology of the body is very different from many Christian traditions. Within marriage, sex isn’t just for procreation, but also for pleasure, intimacy and becoming god like. So, what’s the disconnect in a culture where there seems to be so much shame and guilt around sexuality? She’ll join us live, along with LDS sex therapist Kristin Hodson and Chris Duce of the “Celestial Sex” podcast.

Historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich grew up in Sugar City, Idaho, and in the late 50s, she figured she would just “get married and have children.” So it may surprise you to hear that she coined the phrase “well-behaved women seldom make history.” Ulrich is a Mormon, a feminist, a Harvard professor, and a Pulitzer Prize-winner. She’s dedicated her career to telling the stories of early American women and helping modern women find their voices. She’s in Utah, and joins Doug on Monday.

The LDS Church ended the practice of polygamy more than a century ago, but author and activist Carol Lynn Pearson says the idea is “alive and unwell” in Mormon theology. According to doctrine, a man can still be spiritually sealed to multiple wives and those plural marriages are a reality in heaven. Pearson has gathered stories from more than 8000 faithful and former LDS Church members, and joins Doug Tuesday to explain why she says polygamy is still haunting Mormons today.

Ordain Women

Earlier this week, Mormon feminist Kate Kelly was excommunicated from the LDS Church. Leaders in her former Virginia ward said her ongoing effort to secure women's ordination to the all-male priesthood constituted "conduct contrary to the laws and order of the Church." Wednesday, we're asking what her excommunication means, not just for Kelly personally, but for all women and activists in the LDS Church. Kelly will join Doug. He'll also talk to Mormon commentator Neylan McBaine and historian Amanda Hendrix-Komoto.

<a href="http://bit.ly/U4ei46">Micah Sheldon</a>, CC via Flickr

Tuesday, we're continuing our conversation on discipline and excommunication in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Doug's guest for the hour is Ally Isom, Senior Manager of Public Affairs with the LDS Church. Two high-profile, progressive Mormon activists have been called before their local leaders and are being threatened with excommunication. It's raised a lot of questions about what makes a faithful Mormon, the disciplinary process and what all this reveals about the modern LDS Church.

Last week, two prominent voices in the progressive Mormon community were notified they face possible excommunication from the LDS Church. John Dehlin is creator of a popular podcast discussing Mormon issues and an advocate for LGBT rights. Kate Kelly is founder of Ordain Women, the group seeking access to the all-male priesthood. Monday, Doug sits down with each to talk about what excommunication would mean to them personally and the reaction they've been getting from their communities.

Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with writer and scholar Joanna Brooks, known for her progressive but generous observations of Mormon culture. She was raised devout, but left the LDS Church for a time when she couldn't reconcile her feminism and intellectual curiosity with the faith of her childhood. Her story is somewhat unique for this plot twist though, she went back. Brooks joins Doug to talk about her memoir, "The Book of Mormon Girl." (Rebroadcast)

Eric Samuelsen's "3"

Mar 25, 2014

Wednesday, we're profiling the last play in Plan B Theatre's season dedicated to Utah playwright Eric Samuelsen. It's called 3, and it consists of three one-acts about contemporary Mormon women. Samuelsen's play doesn't follow the headlines of LDS women seeking access to the Church's all-male priesthood, and it's not the satirical characters often found on Utah stages. It's an intimate portrait of women navigating their own culture. He'll join Doug, along with director Cheryl Ann Cluff and cast, to talk about the production.

More Good Foundation, CC via Flickr http://bit.ly/Of8IbU

Tuesday, we’re joined by Jodi Kantor and Laurie Goodstein, reporters at the New York Times whose recent articles about the role of women in the LDS Church appeared in the paper. Kantor and Goodstein spent months interviewing women around the world about their Mormon experience. We’ll talk to them about what they learned about the evolving role of women in the faith. We’ll also ask how the church is adapting as women wield increasing economic sway and more responsibility in the workplace, and we hope to hear from you.

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