Money/Business

4:29pm

Mon April 7, 2014
April 8, 2014 | Money/Business

The Boom

Every day, one hundred new oil and gas wells are drilled and hydraulically fractured in America. The recent fracking boom has produced immense amounts of energy, income and a whole lot of controversy. In a new book called The Boom, Wall Street Journal reporter Russell Gold attempts to cut through the noise from both sides to understand how we can best procure the energy we rely on every day. Gold joins us Tuesday to examine the economic, environmental and social impacts of where our energy comes from.

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3:34pm

Fri March 7, 2014
March 10, 2014 | Money/Business

The Meat Racket

Just a handful of companies raise nearly all the meat consumed in America, and among them, Tyson Foods is king. According to the journalist Christopher Leonard, Tyson wrote the blueprint for modern meat production. He says there’s no better way to understand how our food is produced than to know how the company works. In a new book, Leonard explores how Tyson mastered the economics of factory farming to rise to the top, and how it transformed rural America and the middle class economy in the process. He joins us Monday to talk about it.

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2:00pm

Fri November 22, 2013
November 25, 2013 | Money/Business | Rebroadcast

The Dangers of Austerity

In the wake of the Great Recession, large Western governments have tried to keep their economies afloat by imposing austerity measures. The hope is that by reducing wages and spending they could bail themselves out of budget deficits and jumpstart global economic growth. The political economist Mark Blyth says that plan hasn’t worked out. He says austerity has led to sluggish growth and increasing inequality, and not for the first time, either. Blyth joins us to explain why austerity, like a zombie, is a dangerous idea that just won’t die. [Rebroadcast]

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8:14pm

Sun September 8, 2013
September 9, 2013 | Money/Business

(Re)Working

Image by Alan Cleaver/Creative Commons via flickr

Let’s face it: sometimes not much work done gets done at work. Software developer Jason Fried thinks he knows why that is. He says the modern office is tailor made for interruptions, and interruptions are the bane of good work. Fried also says people are much more efficient when they’re working in their kitchens, or at a coffee shop or the library—basically anywhere but at the office. Fried joins us Monday to make the case for redesigning the workplace for better collaboration, creativity and productivity.

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4:49pm

Wed August 7, 2013
August 8, 2013 | Money/Business

The Dangers of Austerity

In the wake of the Great Recession, large Western governments have tried to keep their economies afloat by imposing austerity measures. The hope is that by reducing wages and spending they could bail themselves out of budget deficits and jumpstart global economic growth. The political economist Mark Blyth says that plan hasn’t worked out. He says austerity has led to sluggish growth and increasing inequality, and not for the first time, either. Blyth joins us Thursday to explain why austerity, like a zombie, is a dangerous idea that just won’t die.

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12:30pm

Mon July 1, 2013
July 2, 2013 | Money/Business | Rebroadcast

Salt Sugar Fat

Salt, sugar and fat are the most prevalent ingredients in the processed foods that now dominate American appetites. According to investigative reporter Michael Moss, food manufacturers cram as much of those three ingredients as possible into their products in order to make them irresistible. But high levels of salt, sugar and fat have also made us obese and unhealthy. Moss has written a new book investigating the food science and corporate scheming that have distorted the American diet and put our health at risk, and he joins us Tuesday to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)

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4:35pm

Tue April 16, 2013
April 17, 2013 | Money/Business

Salt Sugar Fat

Salt, sugar and fat are the most prevalent ingredients in the processed foods that now dominate American appetites. According to investigative reporter Michael Moss, food manufacturers cram as much of those three ingredients as possible into their products in order to make them irresistible. But high levels of salt, sugar and fat have also made us obese and unhealthy. Moss has written a new book investigating the food science and corporate scheming that have distorted the American diet and put our health at risk, and he joins us on Wednesday to talk about it.

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10:14am

Wed March 6, 2013
February 6, 2013 | Money/Business

The Cost of Higher Education

Image by marsmet531/Creative Commons via flickr

The increasing cost of a college education concerns people regardless of their income level or politics. It’s the subject of congressional hearings, protests and everyday conversation. But why does higher education cost so much? Are our universities simply dysfunctional and inefficient? Or is it more complicated than that? Wednesday, we’ll explore those questions in front of a live audience at the Hinckley Institute of Politics. The scholars Robert Archibald and Nicholas Hillman are our guests. And we hope you’ll join us, too.

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4:15pm

Tue March 5, 2013
March 5, 2013 | Money/Business

John Warnock: Higher Ed and High Tech

Tuesday on RadioWest, we continue our discussion about innovation at colleges and universities with Dr. John Warnock. Warnock was a student at the University of Utah in the 1960s. After graduating, he and colleague Charles Geschke founded one of the most successful software companies in the world: Adobe. Warnock’s education at the U laid the groundwork for the ideas he helped pioneer at Adobe. So here’s the question: how can today’s universities stimulate and encourage a new generation of innovators?

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4:15pm

Tue March 5, 2013
March 4, 2013 | Money/Business

The Innovative University

Monday, we begin a weeklong series of shows, in partnership with the Hinckley Institute of Politics, about the future of higher education. Pressures from all sides are forcing traditional universities to drastically reform. Henry J. Eyring, an administrator at BYU-Idaho, says reform should include changes people wouldn't expect, such as reducing costs, allowing students to customize their degrees and taking classes online. It's called “disruptive innovation,” and Eyring will join us to talk about it.

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