News

State, National and World News

Micah Sheldon via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1O4Qt4z

Tuesday, as the sun sets on 2015, we’re discussing the biggest Utah news stories of the year. It was a year full of notable political and cultural developments. Salt Lake City elected a new mayor and was chosen as the new home for the state prison. Fights continued over both public lands and election reform. Gay marriage advocates rejoiced over a historic Supreme Court ruling, and the LDS Church adopted new restrictions on gay members. There’s a lot to talk about, so we hope you’ll join us.

Thierry Ehrmann via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1Bo4c0j

In March, the journalist Graeme Wood joined us to put the Islamic State under the microscope. What is it? Where did it come from, and what does it want? In an article for The Atlantic magazine, Wood argued that ISIS seeks to revert civilization to a “seventh-century legal environment, and ultimately bring about the apocalypse,” and it’s committed to killing vast numbers of people in the process. We talked about ISIS’s intellectual genealogy and why it’s imperative the West better understand it. (Rebroadcast)

via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1XVcKVC

News broke last week that the LDS Church was adopting new policies aimed at married same-sex couples and their children. Mormons in a same-sex marriage will now be considered apostates and could be subject to disciplinary hearings and excommunication. Their children, meanwhile, will be barred from many of the faith’s sacred rituals, unless they get permission from church’s highest leaders. Monday, a panel of guests will join us to discuss the impacts and ramifications of these new church policies.

Photo by <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/allaboutgeorge/4426219005/in/photolist-7K8wGM">George Kelly</a>, CC via Flickr

This weekend, the Salt Lake Tribune reported that Jon Huntsman, Sr’s efforts to buy the state’s largest daily newspaper had reached “an impasse.” The paper operates under an agreement that gives veto power of a sale to the LDS Church and 70% of the profits to the Church-owned Deseret News. Journalism professor Matthew LaPlante says without a renegotiation it’s hard to imagine anyone willing to buy the struggling daily. Wednesday, he joins us to talk about the future of this two-newspaper town.

 

It sounds like science fiction, but a cyberattack on America's power grid could be launched from a single laptop anywhere in the world. The results would be devastating, especially in cities, where food and water shortages would occur in days. Nevertheless, veteran journalist Ted Koppel says our government is woefully unprepared for such a calamity. He joins us Tuesday to talk about his investigation into this unique threat and potential ways to prepare for a catastrophe that is all but inevitable.

brykmantra via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1LK1GCe

After Governor Gary Herbert’s plan for expanding Medicaid coverage died in the Utah state legislature this spring, six Republican leaders were tasked with devising a compromise plan. They met behind closed doors for months. The plan they recently unveiled, Utah Access Plus, called on health care providers to contribute $50 million in subsidies. That plan died Tuesday afternoon in a GOP meeting. Wednesday, we’ll discuss how the plan was crafted, why it failed, and ask what comes next Medicaid in Utah.

Peace Officer

Oct 5, 2015

William “Dub” Lawrence was Sheriff of Davis County and founder of Utah’s first SWAT team. He would have never imagined that 30 years later, that Davis County SWAT team would kill his son-in-law in a controversial stand-off. In their new documentary, Utah filmmakers Brad Barber and Scott Christopherson follow Dub on his mission to figure out what went wrong with the system he once served. They’ll join us Monday to talk about their film and about how policing is changing nationwide.

Thursday we’re asking what it would take to get you out of your car. Urban planner Tim Sullivan says the West was built around the ideas of freedom, opportunity and adventure. Although the car helped get us there, Sullivan argues the car is now threatening the things we love about our region. He and others join Doug to talk about our attitude towards the automobile and the obstacles and opportunities for walking, biking and taking the train on the Wasatch Front.

Tuesday, our guest is feminist writer Katha Pollitt, whose latest book aims at reclaiming abortion rights. Pollitt argues the pro-choice movement has become too defensive in making the case for a woman’s right to end her pregnancy. She says abortion has always existed and that it’s a normal part of women’s reproductive lives. In fact, nearly 1 in 3 women in America will have an abortion by age 45. Pollitt is coming to Utah, and joins Doug to discuss why she says abortion is good for society. 

Monday, we’re talking about the history of socialism in the United States. Our guest is historian Michael Kazin, who says though self-described democratic socialist presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is unlikely to win, his campaign isn’t ridiculous. Kazin explains that Sanders is just the latest socialist candidate to highlight issues that “discomfort the comfortable.” We’ll ask why socialism never really took hold in the U.S. and what it’s nevertheless contributed to American political life.

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