Politics

State, National and World News

Matthew D. LaPlante, For the Deseret News

Friday, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Utah journalist Matthew LaPlante about life and survival in one of the world’s most dangerous place, El Salvador.

Brandy Berthelson via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2FMscAD

As state legislators gear up for another 45 days on Capitol Hill, we’re handicapping the 2018 Utah Legislative session and gauging the state’s political winds with the help of a panel of local reporters.

Michael Vadon via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2mzeo3z

The reporter McKay Coppins joins us to talk about his profile of Vice President Mike Pence. Coppins investigates why Pence and Christian conservatives have created an unlikely alliance with Donald Trump. Pence believes it's all part of a divine plan.

Gage Skidmore / CC via Flickr

Wednesday, we’re talking about Senator Orrin Hatch’s decision to retire after more than 40 years in office. We’ll explore his career, his legacy, and ask who may run in his place.

Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the case of the Colorado baker who refused to make a custom wedding cake for a gay couple. Court observers Amy Wildermuth and RonNell Andersen Jones join us to talk about what happened.

As a real estate mogul, President Trump is impressed by how much open land Utah has. As president, he wants less of it protected as national monuments. So he cut out two million acres of monument lands, to the delight of some and the anger of others.

And Thrasher via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2B1Fki7

Monday, we’re wading into the debate over the GOP tax cut plan. Who will it benefit the most? Some economists contend it's an act of pure greed and “daylight robbery,” while others say trickle-down tax cuts can restore American prosperity.

The first Monday in October marks a new term for the U.S. Supreme Court, and we’ve got University of Utah legal scholars Amy Wildermuth and RonNell Andersen Jones in studio. We’ll talk about the dynamics of the bench and the effect of President Trump’s appointment Neil Gorsuch. We’ll also break down some of the cases that are on the docket like gerrymandering, cake baking, and cell phone privacy. We'll also throw in a few procedural questions for you SCOTUS nerds.

The Gatekeepers

Aug 2, 2017
Public domain

Wednesday, journalist Chris Whipple joins us to talk about what’s been called the toughest job in Washington. White House Chiefs of Staff serves as gatekeepers to the Oval Office, and they help define the course of the country. Whipple interviewed all 17 men still living who have served in the position. Ultimately, he says, their style makes or breaks each presidency. We’ll examine the job’s unique challenges and ask how new chief of staff John Kelly might shake up the current West Wing.

Tuesday, we’re talking about a proposed ballot initiative aimed at addressing perceived flaws in how Utah draws its electoral districts. Redrawing district lines to benefit the political party in power, AKA gerrymandering, is almost as old as America itself. But the bi-partisan organizers behind the initiative say the way electoral boundaries are drawn in Utah allows politicians to choose their voters, when it should be the other way around. We’ll talk about their efforts, and we hope to hear from you, too.

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