Politics

State, National and World News

Roland Li via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2sgtqzc

Monday, we’re talking about the Democratic Party in Utah, and we’re asking this question: is the party still relevant? It wasn’t long ago that Utah had a Democratic governor, or a Democratic congressional delegate. But, oh, how times have changed. Democrats now hold just 12 of 75 seats in the state legislature. The party won only 10 of 55 contested state races in last year’s general election, and Dems lost many of those races by massive margins. So what gives? And what can the party do to reverse its fortunes?

U.S. Department of the Interior, CC BY-SA 2.0

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke submitted a report to the White House over the weekend recommending Bears Ears National Monument be shrunk. While there are places there he thinks should be protected by the Antiquities Act, Zinke says the boundaries should be revised. He also suggests congress consider different conservation plans for the area, re-examine wilderness designations, and approve co-management by Native American tribes. Tuesday, we’re talking about what all this means for the future of Bears Ears.

In her latest book, media analyst Brooke Gladstone tries to understand the current landscape of “fact” and “truth” in the United States. Facts, she says are crucial for negotiation and compromise in a democracy. Truth, though, is subjective. So how have we reached a point where reality is so fractured? Gladstone joins Doug to talk about lies, the Trump administration, journalism, and why we all need to know more about each other's truth.

Tuesday, we’re talking about conservatism and whether today’s Republican Party is living up to the label. Our guest is journalist and BYU law student Sara Jarman, who has just published a book which argues true conservatism is contemplative and measured, principles that have been lost over the years. Jarman says that whatever your views, this matters because a healthy political system requires a balance between conservative and progressive forces. Her book is called “Elephants on the Rampage.”

Judy Fahys

Last week, President Donald Trump ordered Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review the designation of every national monument declared via the Antiquities Act since January 1, 1996. The order is especially relevant to Utah. Grand Staircase-Escalante was the only monument proclaimed in ’96. And Secretary Zinke said he would in short order make a specific recommendation on the state’s new Bears Ears Monument. Wednesday, we’re asking what this review means for Utah. We’ll also discuss the history and future of the Antiquities Act.

The Chaffetz Effect

Apr 24, 2017

Last week, Jason Chaffetz abruptly announced he would not seek reelection for Utah’s 3rd congressional district in 2018. He’s also said he might not even finish the term he started just 4 months ago, which has a number of Utah Republicans eyeing his seat. Monday, we’re talking about Chaffetz’s decision and its fallout. We’ll ask what it means for the congressional oversight committee Chaffetz chairs and how his next moves, including a possible run for governor, could affect Utah politics.

James Palinsad (http://bit.ly/2mSdcGv) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Earlier this month, Utah legislators passed a bill that would give the state the strictest DUI law in the country. The Beehive State was the first to lower the legal blood-alcohol content from .1 to .08, and the new law, if signed by Governor Gary Herbert, would further lower that limit to .05. Supporters say doing so will reduce drunk driving and save lives, while opponents worry that the law will hurt restaurants, bars, and the state’s reputation. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides.

In a new book, former manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Pat Mulroy says we’re facing a tough global reality when it comes to water. Growth, urbanization, and the effects of climate change mean we have to find new ways to manage a resource she says most Americans simply take for granted. Mulroy is coming to Utah, and she joins Doug Wednesday to explain what’s at stake, and how creating a shared vision for our water future is more important than ever.

Exit polls from November’s election found that 1 in 5 people said Supreme Court appointments were “the most important factor” in casting their Presidential vote. Well, this week President Donald Trump announced his nominee for the Court’s empty seat, and Neil Gorsuch is the potential justice Republicans have been waiting for. Thursday, Doug sits down with University of Utah law professors Amy Wildermuth and RonNell Andersen Jones to talk about what the appointment heralds for the Court.

Friday we’re asking whether the Outdoor Retailer Trade Show would leave Salt Lake City because of the public land agenda of state lawmakers. Peter Metcalf, the founder of the outdoor company Black Diamond, says the trade show should consider leaving if state leaders don’t back off from their attempt to take ownership of public land. But these kinds of warnings have been made before. What’s different this time, and what is the economic value of public land in Utah? Metcalf and others join us.

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