Politics

State, National and World News

The first Monday in October marks a new term for the U.S. Supreme Court, and we’ve got University of Utah legal scholars Amy Wildermuth and RonNell Andersen Jones in studio. We’ll talk about the dynamics of the bench and the effect of President Trump’s appointment Neil Gorsuch. We’ll also break down some of the cases that are on the docket like gerrymandering, cake baking, and cell phone privacy. We'll also throw in a few procedural questions for you SCOTUS nerds.

The Gatekeepers

Aug 2, 2017
Public domain

Wednesday, journalist Chris Whipple joins us to talk about what’s been called the toughest job in Washington. White House Chiefs of Staff serves as gatekeepers to the Oval Office, and they help define the course of the country. Whipple interviewed all 17 men still living who have served in the position. Ultimately, he says, their style makes or breaks each presidency. We’ll examine the job’s unique challenges and ask how new chief of staff John Kelly might shake up the current West Wing.

Tuesday, we’re talking about a proposed ballot initiative aimed at addressing perceived flaws in how Utah draws its electoral districts. Redrawing district lines to benefit the political party in power, AKA gerrymandering, is almost as old as America itself. But the bi-partisan organizers behind the initiative say the way electoral boundaries are drawn in Utah allows politicians to choose their voters, when it should be the other way around. We’ll talk about their efforts, and we hope to hear from you, too.

The Atlantic

Tuesday, we’re asking what the United States should do about North Korea. The secluded country has South Korea in its military cross hairs, and its goal is to pose a nuclear threat to the U.S. The regime of Kim Jong Un fired a missile last month that went farther than any attempt, and experts say it’s only a matter of time before they can reach American soil. Journalist Mark Bowden has written an article about what the United States can do to confront this threat, and he’ll join us to discuss it.

Roland Li via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2sgtqzc

Monday, we’re talking about the Democratic Party in Utah, and we’re asking this question: is the party still relevant? It wasn’t long ago that Utah had a Democratic governor, or a Democratic congressional delegate. But, oh, how times have changed. Democrats now hold just 12 of 75 seats in the state legislature. The party won only 10 of 55 contested state races in last year’s general election, and Dems lost many of those races by massive margins. So what gives? And what can the party do to reverse its fortunes?

U.S. Department of the Interior, CC BY-SA 2.0

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke submitted a report to the White House over the weekend recommending Bears Ears National Monument be shrunk. While there are places there he thinks should be protected by the Antiquities Act, Zinke says the boundaries should be revised. He also suggests congress consider different conservation plans for the area, re-examine wilderness designations, and approve co-management by Native American tribes. Tuesday, we’re talking about what all this means for the future of Bears Ears.

Photo by simpleinsomnia, CC via Flickr, http://bit.ly/2rRq3Nu

In her latest book, media analyst Brooke Gladstone tries to understand the current landscape of “fact” and “truth” in the United States. Facts, she says are crucial for negotiation and compromise in a democracy. Truth, though, is subjective. So how have we reached a point where reality is so fractured? Gladstone joins Doug to talk about lies, the Trump administration, journalism, and why we all need to know more about each other's truth.

Tuesday, we’re talking about conservatism and whether today’s Republican Party is living up to the label. Our guest is journalist and BYU law student Sara Jarman, who has just published a book which argues true conservatism is contemplative and measured, principles that have been lost over the years. Jarman says that whatever your views, this matters because a healthy political system requires a balance between conservative and progressive forces. Her book is called “Elephants on the Rampage.”

Judy Fahys

Last week, President Donald Trump ordered Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review the designation of every national monument declared via the Antiquities Act since January 1, 1996. The order is especially relevant to Utah. Grand Staircase-Escalante was the only monument proclaimed in ’96. And Secretary Zinke said he would in short order make a specific recommendation on the state’s new Bears Ears Monument. Wednesday, we’re asking what this review means for Utah. We’ll also discuss the history and future of the Antiquities Act.

The Chaffetz Effect

Apr 24, 2017

Last week, Jason Chaffetz abruptly announced he would not seek reelection for Utah’s 3rd congressional district in 2018. He’s also said he might not even finish the term he started just 4 months ago, which has a number of Utah Republicans eyeing his seat. Monday, we’re talking about Chaffetz’s decision and its fallout. We’ll ask what it means for the congressional oversight committee Chaffetz chairs and how his next moves, including a possible run for governor, could affect Utah politics.

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