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Political Tribes

Apr 8, 2019
IIP Photo Archive, CC via Flickr, https://bit.ly/2H8H2ox

 

Legal scholar Amy Chua says tribalism is tearing the U.S. apart, and in order to build unity, we need to understand how identity politics have hijacked the left and the right.

Robert Thivierge / Flickr CC

Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. She's former ACLU president, and she argues that censorship just doesn’t work. The way to resist hate speech, she says, is with more free speech.

The Library of Congress via Wikimedia Commons

The journalist Yoni Appelbaum says that to understand what impeaching Donald Trump would mean, it helps to look at the case of the 17th president, Andrew Johnson. His impeachment, Appelbaum says, brought order out of chaos.

The Atlantic

According to analysis by The Atlantic, Salt Lake and Summit Counties are pretty prejudiced. The least prejudiced place is a little town in New York. Journalist Amanda Ripley went to find out why.

TaxCredits.net / CC via Flickr

Monday, we’re beginning a series of conversations about health care in the country and the best way to get it to the most people. We’re starting with a conservative case for the single-payer model.

Nicole Nixon / KUER

Friday, we’re recapping the 2019 Utah Legislative session. There's a lot to talk about, from the shrinking of voter-approved Medicaid expansion, to restrictions on abortion rights, stronger beer, and a stronger hate crimes law.

Why Are We So Angry?

Mar 11, 2019
The Atlantic

America has always been an angry nation, says the writer Charles Duhigg. But these days our anger out of hand. Duhigg joins us explore the power of anger, how it works, and how it can be turned back into a national strength.

istock by Getty Images

Monday, we’re discussing a legislative bill that would strengthen Utah’s hate crimes law. Public prosecutors have called the present law "worthless," but does it really need to be replaced?

Washington's Farewell

Feb 18, 2019
Flickr

George Washington's prophetic farewell address was once revered as civic scripture. In it, he expressed fear that hyper-partisanship, excessive debt, and foreign wars could destroy the country. 

Nicole Nixon / KUER

Utah voters approved Medicaid expansion in November, but since they opened their session a week ago, some lawmakers have been trying to change the initiative or repeal it all together. Should they?

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